Become Camera

Site specific performance with analogue security system (4 cameras, 4 monitors, BNC cable)

The everyday person is being constantly surveilled whether they like it or not via phones, security cameras, laptops, satellite imaging, etcetera. As a brown man with a beard I experience a heightened form of surveillance. I’m not only watched by technology; I’m being watched everywhere I go by those on the streets, in stores, and in restaurants because of a stigma created solely on my appearance.

Become Camera is a durational performance, it begins with me as a human surveiller loudly sneaking around the gallery trying to watch the audience while simultaneously attempting to hide from them and the surveillance cameras. This allows the audience to witness an over-exaggerated example of the heightened surveillance I undergo in my daily life. Over time my actions become slower and slower, gradually taking the attention off of me until I become a stationary camera blending into the walls of the gallery. By the end my perspective as an individual is flipped, I’m no longer a brown man on the streets but rather a part of the majority that blends in and stares at others.

 

Become Camera is an extended meditation from a series I began in 2016 titled, Always Watching Part I: A Conversation with the TSA.

 

Performances/Installations:

2018           Become Camera (Solo show)

Melwood Gallery PF/PCA (Pittsburgh, PA)

                   2 month solo installation featuring multi-channel video, 

                    Snapchat and Instagram interventions, and three

                    durational performances ranging from 2.5HRS - 8HRS

                    (12/9/17, 1/25/18, 2/9/18).

 

2017          LiveArt.US “Performing Resistance” 

                   Queens Museum (NYC, NY)

                   20 minute performance, video, and sound.

 

                  The Kitchen Sink: A Night of Performances

                  3577 Studios (Pittsburgh, PA)

                  2.5HR durational performance.

 

Press:

Pittsburgh Filmmakers

Pittsburgh City Paper